Unit 1 – Some Basic Concepts of Chemistry – Exercise

Important formula Density of a substance tells us about how closely its particles are packed. If density is more, it means particles are more closely packed. Density = Mass / Volume SI unit of density = SI unit of mass/ SI unit of volume = kg / m³ or kg m-3 There are three common scales to measure temperature — °C (degree celsius), °F (degree fahrenheit) and K (kelvin). Freezing point of water 0°C Boiling point of water 100 °C The temperatures on two scales are related to each other…

6.2.2 Enthalpy, H

(a) A Useful New State Function We know that the heat absorbed at constant volume is equal to change in the internal energy i.e., ΔU = qv . But most of chemical reactions are carried out not at constant volume, but in flasks or test tubes under constant atmospheric pressure. We need to define another state function which may be suitable under these conditions. We may write equation ΔU= q + w  as  ΔU = qp  – pΔV at constant pressure, where qp is heat absorbed by the system and…

6.2.1 Work

  First of all, let us concentrate on the nature of work a system can do. We will consider only mechanical work i.e., pressure-volume work. For understanding pressure-volume work, let us consider a cylinder which contains one mole of an ideal gas fitted with a frictionless piston. Total volume of the gas is Vi and pressure of the gas inside is p. If external pressure is pex which is greater than p, piston is moved inward till the pressure inside becomes equal to pex. Let this change be achieved in a…

6.2 Applications

Many chemical reactions involve the generation of gases capable of doing mechanical work or the generation of heat. It is important for us to quantify these changes and relate them to the changes in the internal energy.

6.1.4 The Internal Energy as a State Function

When we talk about our chemical system losing or gaining energy, we need to introduce a quantity which represents the total energy of the system. It may be chemical, electrical, mechanical or any other type of energy you may think of, the sum of all these is the energy of the system. In thermodynamics, we call it the internal energy, U of the system, which may change, when heat passes into or out of the system work is done on or by the system matter enters or leaves the system…

6.1.3 The State of the System

The system must be described in order to make any useful calculations by specifying quantitatively each of the properties such as its pressure (p), volume (V), and temperature (T ) as well as the composition of the system. We need to describe the system by specifying it before and after the change. You would recall from your Physics course that the state of a system in mechanics is completely specified at a given instant of time, by the position and velocity of each mass point of the system. In thermodynamics,…

6.1.2 Types of the System

We, further classify the systems according to the movements of matter and energy in or out of the system. Open System In an open system, there is exchange of energy and matter between system and surroundings. The presence of reactants in an open beaker is an example of an open system*. Here the boundary is an imaginary surface enclosing the beaker and reactants.   Closed System In a closed system, there is no exchange of matter, but exchange of energy is possible between system and the surroundings. The presence of…

6.1.1 The System and the Surroundings

A system in thermodynamics refers to that part of universe in which observations are made and remaining universe constitutes the surroundings. The surroundings include everything other than the system. System and the surroundings together constitute the universe . The universe = The system + The surroundings However, the entire universe other than the system is not affected by the changes taking place in the system. Therefore, for all practical purposes, the surroundings are that portion of the remaining universe which can interact with the system. Usually, the region of space…